Tag Archives: Vegetables

{ Asian Sesame Noodles }

Asian Sesame Noodles

I love cold pasta salads.

…..which is probably why Whole Foods rapes my wallet every time that I set food in their prepared food’s aisle–I am an absolute sucker for their Asian Sesame Noodles. For those of you not living on a budget, let me just tell you that veggie-laced pasta is not forgiving on the scale at check-out. If your watching your spending, go for the spinach leaves, bean sprouts, mushrooms, seeds, and sun-dried tomatoes because they are light weight ingredients but don’t even think about cucumbers, tomatoes, or fresh fruit unless you want Whole Foods to take your Whole Paycheck!

It never ceases to amaze me how one tiny brown box of protein-less pasta can equate to a meal upwards of $10, but of course I ponder this while handing over my credit card to pay the cashier for my overpriced, yet highly anticipated, meal. Tonight I just couldn’t justify it though. Between my sparkling probiotic beverage and my sesame noodles, I was going to be out at least $15, so I passed on the salad bar and set out to make my own Asian noodle dish using whatever I already had in the pantry at home. Fortunately, that included an box of buckwheat Soba noodles that I had bought for a previous recipe and never used!

This recipe is nothing like the Whole Foods Asian noodles, but it incorporates a lot more veggies and makes for a more satisfying meal, especially if topped with grilled chicken, pork tenderloin, or tofu. It is very easy to make, and holds in the fridge for about 3 days without drying out.

The Whole Foods noodles will continue to tempt me, but this recipe is a fantastic alternative and entirely more budget friendly.

{ Ingredients }

  • 1 package of soba noodles
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon hot chili oil
  • 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
  • 1-2 teaspoons Sriracha
  • 4-5 tablespoons EVOO (depending on how much dressing you like)
  • 1 carrot, julienned
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup shredded napa cabbage
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, julienned
  • 1 cup bean sprouts
  • 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves, minced
  • 3 tablespoons black toasted sesame seeds
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted peanuts, crushed for garnish

{ To Make the Noodles }

Cook soba noodles according to package directions. When finished, place the noodles in an ice water bath to cool, and then drain and set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, chili oil, and EVOO. Mix well with a whisk.

Combine the noodles, prepared vegetables, and cilantro and toss with sauce until evenly coated.

Top with toasted sesame seeds and chopped peanuts, and serve with a wedge of lime.

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Filed under Asian Cuisine, Recipes

{ Best Lunch Spots in Buck’s County }

Finding good food on-the-go is tough when you don’t live in a city studded with Pret a Manager, Chipotle, and five-star food trucks. In Buck’s County, the options are pretty limited to full-service, sit-down restaurants or drive-thru, fast-food establishments. If you don’t brown paper bag it to work, you’re looking at either an overpriced gourmet salad, a 40-minute sushi luncheon, or a greasy quarter-pounder in the McDonald’s parking lot. But thankfully, local restaurant owners are finally starting to fill this market gap by opening quick-service lunch spots with high-quality food.

Here is a list of my favorite lunch spots in Buck’s County:

1. { Sariano’s Country Cafe }

CHECK OUT THE MENU!

Located right in the heart of Lahaska, is this adorable French cafe with homemade croissants, fresh soups, and delicious Croque Monsieur sandwiches. You can eat al fresco at any of the outdoor cafe tables, or take your order to-go (just be warned that there is only one indoor table, so might not be the best option for a cold/rainy day!). The menu is posted on a black board behind the counter, and although isn’t terribly long, neither is the wait for your food!

I highly recommend the Grilled Vegetable & Mozzarella Sandwich, which is served warm on a Fresh Butter Croissant ($7.00). The vegetables are chopped up nice and small, and the croissant provides delicious and sturdy base for the sandwich, keeping it together as you eat.

Of course, this being a French cafe, I also recommend the Croque Monsieur sandwiches, which are served on homemade French bread. They have the classic Ham & Cheese ($5.50), but I suggest trying the Goat Cheese & Proscuitto ($6.50) combination, which isn’t something you see every day! Keep in mind that these sandwiches are served hot, so the cheese is warm and bubbly when they come out of the oven. Delicious.

And lastly, I really enjoy Sariano’s Shrimp & Corn Chowder Soup ($7.00), which is creamy and slightly spicy but not too heavy. The soup prices seems a little high, when compared those of the sandwiches, but the portions are really generous and it comes accompanied with your choice of crackers or homemade French bread.

If you’re really in a hurry, Sariano’s also offers an assortment of pre-made meals that you can choose from.

2. { Jule’s Thin Crust }

Photo taken from TheMainLineVine

CHECK OUT THE MENU!

With new locations popping up all over Buck’s County, it is clear that Jule’s Thin Crust has found a recipe for success. This gourmet pizza shop, which relies heavily on locally and organically grown produce, offer 22+ varieties of pizza, innovative salads, and gluten-free, as well as whole-wheat, products. If you stop by for just a few slices, you can choose from anything available on the line and get back to work within 10 minutes. And if you’d rather place a full pie or custom order, you’re looking at a total wait time of about 15 minutes, but you’re more than welcome to bring a bottle of wine to help pass the time while you wait! Just keep in mind that you’re still at a pizza place, so to all my wine-snobs: NO, there will not be glassware!

I suggest trying the new Buffalo Chicken Pizza with hormone free chicken, chopped celery, blue cheese, mozzarella, arugala, and buffalo sauce ($2.90 per slice). Or the Kim’s Pie with hormone free chicken, portobello mushrooms, caramelized onions, balsamic BBQ glaze, mozzarella, and chives ($2.90 per slice).

Another classic, loved by all, is the Brushetta Pizza with Chopped Organic Tomatoes, Fresh Cubed Mozzarella, Garlic, Oregano, and Arugala, with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil! It will revolutionize your idea of pizza.

3. { Marhaba }

Photo Taken from The New York Times

CHECK OUT THE MENU!

Tucked away on a side street in Lambertville, is one of the best Middle Eastern Restaurants that I have ever been to! The interior is cozy, the prices are reasonable, and the food is authentic and a-m-a-z-i-n-g. The Gyro Sandwich, which is slow roasted lamb, topped with lettuce, tomato, cucumber, and tahini drizzle on a warm homemade pita ($5.95) is a deal that can’t be beat and so it has become a regular weekly lunch for me and my mother.

Photo Taken from Jersey Foodies

I also recommend the Babaganough, which is a grilled eggplant spread mixed with tahini, garlic, and fresh lemon juice ($5.95) served alongside warm homemade pita bread. The spread has a zesty flavor and a creamy texture, that is beautiful when paired with the zatter spices on the pita bread.

Photo Taken from ThePalatePrincess

4. { Genivieves Panini & Salads To-Go }

CHECK OUT THE MENU!

I found this place on Groupon a couple of weeks ago, and I have been hooked ever since! Located in the center of Doylestown, Genivieves serves up seasonally inspired food made with locally produced ingredients. The sandwiches are crafted like a work of art and the flavor combinations are a food-enthusiasts dream. My personal favorites are: the Vegetale with grilled asparagus, plum tomato, gooey taleggio cheese, and fresh pesto on multigrain bread ($7.50);  and the Tuscany with grilled chicken breast, sautéed broccoli rabe, and sharp provolone on rustic ciabatta bread ($7.50). 

In addition to their fabulous warm panini’s, Genivieves also offers gourmet salads, homemade soups, and assorted baked goods. And if you find yourself addicted, as I have, then you can also order their food for catered dinners with 24 hours advance notice. Unfortunately, Genivieves is take-out only, so you cannot dine-in.

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Filed under Baking, Cafe / Bistro, Coffee Shop, French Restaurants, Italian Restaurants, Lunch Spots, New Jersey Restaurants, Philadelphia Restaurants, Take-Out

{ Curry Roasted Calabaza with Apples & Honey }

If you think that grocery shopping in the Unites States is annoying and tedious, then you would not believe what it takes in Argentina. It is an all day, sometimes doble day process, that requires one to visit multiple verdulerias (veggie markets), canicerias (meat markets), fruterias (fruit markets), and superchinos (the adopted name for small Korean-owned markets, which clutter the city). There is no such thing as one-stop shopping in Buenos Aires, and finding even the most basic ingredients (i.e. black beans, peanut butter, jalapeños, ect…) can often be as difficult as finding a needle in a haystack. As a result, my culinary skills were contsantly put to the challenge as I was continuously forced to rethink many of my weeknight dinners and side dishes. Given that there is absolutely NO shortage of calabaza  in the city of Buenos Aires (calabaza = Spanish pumpkin), I decided to start incorporating it into my meals to simplify my shopping experience. It very quickly became a grocery staple, right up there along with bread, butter, and eggs.

One of my favorite ways to prepare calabaza is to simply roast it with a seasoning of olive oil, salt, pepper but then one night I decided to add a sprinkling of Indian curry into the mix and it turned out amazing. The next time I prepared the dish, it evolved even further when I added chopped granny smith apples to the roasting pan halfway through baking. The apple cubes compliment the spice of the curry and add the skins provide a little texture to contrast the smooth butteriness of the pumpkin. Drizzle a little honey on top after everything has roasted and viola….deliciousness!

This has undoubtably become one of my favorite side dishes (served either hot or cold), and I even like to eat it as a main dish over white rice.

{ Ingredients }

  • 3 cups calabaza, chopped into 1″ cubes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1-2 teaspoons curry, depending on your taste
  • 1 cup green apple, chopped into 1/2″ cubes
  • Honey, optional for finishing

 { To Prepare } Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Prepare you calabaza, cutting it into 1″ cubes. You can either clean down your own calabaza, or use pre-packaged ones cleaned by the store (as I have shown below).

Place into a large mixing bowl and add olive oil, curry, salt, and pepper, tossing with your hands to coat. Arrange the calabaza on a baking sheet in a single layer and put in oven. NOTE: Make sure to turn over calabaza with a spatula every 3-4 minutes, to ensure even cooking!

While the calabza is cooking, prepare your 1/2″ apple cubes. Add the apples to the baking sheet 10 minutes into the baking process, and return to oven.

Continue to bake for additional 5-10 minutes until the pumpkin is tender and the apple is golden.

Remove from oven, drizzle with 1-2 teaspoons of honey, adjust seasonings, and serve!

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{ Parmesan Roasted Asparagus }

What is a meal without the supporting cast?! Every good entree deserves a delicious side dish, and these parmesan roasted asparagus are one of my all-time favorites! They compliment any protein and taste delicious over rice and risotto. Recently, I have been cooking them in the oven using the broiler setting, but when the weather is nice I prefer to cook them out on the grill. Either way, they taste great!

{ Ingredients }

  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher Salt
  • Freshly grated parmesan cheese

{ To Make the Asparagus } Turn the broiler setting of your oven on high.

Drizzle the asparagus with olive oil and toss to coat. Place the asparagus in a single layer on a baking sheet and put in oven. Cook for 8 minutes, turning the asparagus halfway through cooking process. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with salt and freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately!

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{ Best Ever 3 Egg Garden Omelet }

3 Egg Omelet with Sauteed Spinach, Onions, Asparagus, Jalapenos, and Red Bell Peppers

I have decided to dedicate my body to an experiment for the following 30 days. And originally, I didn’t know if I would disclose this information on my blog or not, but I have decided that I need to since it will be drastically altering my diet and consequently my altering blog! I figured that I might as well be open and honest with my readers, and maybe even some of you can benefit from the findings and will want try it too. I’ll be the guinea pig though, because it is a pretty ridiculous theory that even I’m skeptical about. So what is the experiment, you ask?

For one month, I will not eat sugar, fruit, dairy, or carbohydrates for six days out of the week, followed by a 7th day of binge eating whatever I want until I go into a coma (told you it was ridiculous!). I didn’t make it up though. It is called the slow-carb diet and it comes from the book titled The 4 Hour Body, which is currently a best seller and causing quite a stir in the fitness/weight loss/health world. And how could it not? It goes against everything that every other diet tells you to do. It contradicts everything that I thought was healthy, but rather than be a naysayer that dismisses it as sheer ludicrous, I figured that I would give it a shot and put it to the test!

But before I go on, let me put you all at ease. I’m not trying to lose weight. No, I don’t want be the 80-pound girl with the eating habits of a 400-pound man! Rather, I am trying to lower my percent body fat and build lean muscle. You know, erase the evidence of all the French fries from my hips and thighs and build toned arms. However, the average person that engages in this diet sees a 20-pound body reshaping, between weight loss and total inches lost, in just….drumroll, please….1 month!

For me, this will also be a major test of self-control…probably one of the hardest things I have ever attempted, actually. I can resist the temptation of a lot of things, but I never deny myself food. I eat what I want, when I want. But this will force me to change and think about what I am putting into my body, which will be good for me…and my body!

In addition to the diet, I am also following a fairly rigorous work out schedule because again, my goal is to put on lean muscle. The book claims that you only need 4 hours of solid work out per week (hence the title of the book), but I will probably be engaging in a bit more than that. I will use the blog as my food journal to record how I feel, what I eat, and my progress. Since I will be on such a strict diet, I will probably be eating in more and posting more recipes than usual, but watch out on binge day!!! I will probably have 5 or 6 posts on those nights, as I plan to eat my way fit! Ohh, and if you’re wondering what the purpose of the binge day is, it is used to increase your metabolism and of course satisfy all the cravings you have developed over the week!

So….let the journey begin! Today I started my morning with a delicious 3 egg omelet with sautéed spinach, mushrooms, onions, jalepenos, asparagus, and red bell pepper. I used the whole egg because egg whites don’t really appeal to me, and this is allowed in the diet as long as they are organic eggs. I’ve never had organic eggs, or brown eggs for that matter (apparently all organic eggs are brown eggs), but they tasted the same as white ones….just cost me twice as much. The secret to a perfect omelet is fluffy eggs. Normally, I add a drizzle of milk when I scramble the eggs, but since I am on this diet and restricted from dairy, I used a little bit of cream of tartar instead. You only need a little pinch (very little!!!), which makes the eggs super fluffy. The hardest part about making this omelet today was not putting in any cheese, which is my favorite part!! The thought of no ooey gooey cheese had me in a depression, but surprisingly I didn’t really notice the difference!! I was amazed. I think my associating cheese with eggs had just become habit. I couldn’t imagine one without the other, but I was pretty okay with it today. Of course, I used a ton of Tabasco sauce…but there is nothing against hot sauce in my diet….so spice on.

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{ Lentil Soup }

Lentil Soup

When you think of your favorite vegetable, I highly doubt that lentils come to mind. Maybe we forget about them because they are so small, or because they so rarely appear in the American diet, or because they have very little flavor when cooked improperly (which they often are).  Lentils are kind of like lima beans; people find reasons to dislike them…and not just dislike them, but passionately dislike them—with a vengeance! You never really meet someone who is on the fence about lima beans or lentils—either they love them or loathe them. End of story.

Well I just so happen to love both, and have finally found a lentil soup recipe so delicious that it can convert almost any lentil hater. But before I even get to the recipe, let me first give you some other reasons to love lentils (or at least give them a shot). Lentils, despite their tiny size, derive about 26% of their calories from protein, so they are pretty much a super food. They have the third highest level of protein, by weight, of any plant-based food after soybeans and hemp and Health Magazine ranks lentils as one of the five healthiest foods you can eat. Lentils are a staple in India and the Middle East, and its time for Americans to start appreciating their nutritional value as well.

This lentil soup recipe, which is adapted by one from one by Ina Garten, is healthy, filling, cheap to make, and delicious! It doesn’t look very pretty in a bowl (more like a pile of brown mush) but the flavor is strong and incredible. My roommates were a little skeptical when they first saw me eating it (I was hoping they would stay skeptical so I wouldn’t have to share…no such luck), but they too loved it once they tried it. It’s hearty and warm, and really low in fat. Anytime I’m looking to loose a little belly fat, I replace two meals with this soup and it most certainly does the trick!

Also, this soup freezes great since there is no dairy in it. Since I’m only cooking for myself, I like to buy individual plastic containers that I can freeze single servings in. Take it out the night before and heat it up when you’re ready to eat. Most of the time it tastes even better because the flavors have fully developed.

My only cooking suggestion is to make sure that you only use the white part of the leek, because the green part will make the soup taste bitter. It is okay to use some of the lighter green color but if you use too much the bitterness will come through in the broth. Also, if you decide to use dried thyme leaves instead of fresh ones (I do not recommend this), remember that dried herbs are more pungent and therefore require less so I would only use ½ teaspoon of the dried thyme. And as far as salt goes, I don’t add a whole lot because I prefer to top off my bowl with a heaping of freshly grated parmesan cheese, which has a natural saltiness that comes through and flavors the dish, but feel free to add more salt if you find it too bland.

Ohh, and I almost forgot…it is very important that the garlic does not burn when making this soup so when I sauté my veggies in the stockpot (see directions), I add the garlic about 5 minutes after the rest of the veggies.

{ Ingredients }

  • 1/2 pound French green lentils
  • 2 cups chopped yellow onions
  • 2 cups chopped leeks, white part only
  • 2-3 cloves minced garlic
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 ½ teaspoon fresh chopped thyme leaves
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 ½ cups celery, diced
  • 1 ½ cups carrots, diced
  • 1 ½ quarts chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • Freshly grated parmesan cheese for serving

{ To Make Lentil Soup }

In a large glass bowl, cover the lentils with boiling water and allow to soak for about 20 minutes, or until lentils soften. Drain.

Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium heat and sauté the onions, leeks, and garlic with the salt, pepper, thyme and cumin for 15 minutes, until the vegetables are translucent and tender. Add the carrots and celery and allow to sauté for about 10 more minutes. Add the chicken stock, tomato paste, and lentils. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer uncovered for 1 hour, until the lentils and carrots are cooked through. Check the seasonings. Remove from heat, add the red wine vinegar, stirring to incorporate. Serve hot and garnish with freshly grated parmesan cheese and cracked black pepper.

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{ Roasted Butternut Squash Soup }

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup with Drizzle of Heavy Cream

The holidays are almost over, and it is time to start lightening up our diets. That means no more artichoke dips or mini hot dogs, or cookies in place of breakfast. No more substituting our required 8 glasses of water with egg nog and hot chocolate. And please, no more Costco frozen appetizers! It’s time to start eating lighter and healthier.

I know for a fact that almost everyone has made it their New Year’s resolution to loose weight, or at least start eating right (history tends to repeat itself)! But, we also all know that this is much easier said then done (again, history tends to repeat itself!). It is not surprising that so many people abandon their resolutions before the years end, considering just how challenging it is to find recipes that are healthy and yet still tasty. They do exist, but they are often tricky to find. Thankfully, this year you have my blog to help you locate them! This recipe for roasted butternut squash soup is hearty, full of flavor, and best of all, naturally low in calories!!  It will help you achieve your resolution without forcing you to sacrifice delicious food.

This soup tastes so hearty and feels so satisfying largely because of it’s creamy consistency. There isn’t a ton of milk or cream in it, but the pureed butternut squash is thick and gives the impression of a cream base. In fact, I oftentimes forgo even adding any milk or cream to the soup, and find that the texture is not compromised in the least bit (it also freezes better without the dairy). Flavor wise, the soup has a perfect balance of sweet and spicy with the heat coming from the ginger and cayenne pepper and the sweetness coming from the butternut squash. To add another dimension to the soup, I like to serve mine with croutons on top or a side of fontina cheese crostini; it adds some crunch and breaks up the monotony of the puree. Overall, this soup is fabulous, simple to make, and I highly recommend it!

{ Ingredients }

  • 2 butternut squash
  • 1 spanish onion
  • 2-4 leeks, depending on size (3 medium is ideal)
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, depending on size
  • 1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 (32 oz) containers of chicken stock (or veggie stock)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • (optional) 1/4 cup heavy cream for finishing

{ To Make Soup }

Preheat oven to 350. Cut butternut squash in half lengthwise and rub with oil. Roast in oven on lined baking sheet for about 40-45 minutes, or until fork goes through squash easily.

Once squash is cooked, heat butter and oil in a large stock pot over medium flame. Once hot, saute onion, leek, garlic, and ginger. Season with salt, pepper, and add cayenne pepper. Add chicken stock.

Scoop out seeds from butternut squash and add the pulp into broth. Simmer on low for another 20-30 minutes, covered. Then with immersion blender or regular blender, puree soup. Return to pot and add milk, stirring. Bring to a low simmer for a minute or two. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

Serve in warm bowls with drizzle of cream, if desired.

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{ Tomato Basil Soup }

Tomato Basil Soup

(Adapted from Tyler Florence)
An all-liquid diet equates to hell for a serious foodie. It is even more miserable than I anticipated that it would be, if you can imagine that. For example, I went grocery shopping today and had to actually turn down free samples of food. I never turn down free things, let alone food! It was torture as these older women eagerly waved cubed of aged cheese and sliced salami on toothpicks at me. I had to say “no thank you,” but I was thinking “I want to be fed. I want your samples, I really do, but I just physically cannot eat!” My mom can see my frustration (she caught me reading her cookbooks as literature earlier today) and she decided to make me a nice hearty soup for dinner–tomato basil.
I can’t say that I helped, or even watched my mom make this soup because I was passed out from my pain killers, but it turned out great! She used fresh basil, thyme, and rosemary from our herb garden so the depth of flavor was intense and delicious. She then topped off the soup with some heavy cream and cracked black pepper, which balanced the acidity of the tomatoes perfectly. I ate this as a simple soup tonight, but I think it would also taste delicious over pasta as a faux vodka sauce (once I have teeth again, of course!). I will definitely be adding this to recipe to my own collection, hopefully you will enjoy it too!

{ Ingredients }

  • 2 1/2 pounds fresh tomatoes (mix of heirloom, cherry, wine, and plum)
  • 6 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 2 small yellow onions, sliced
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves
  • 5 fresh sprigs of thym
  • Fresh Parsley
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
{ To Make the Soup
Preheat the over the 450 degrees F.
Wash, core, and cut the tomatoes into halves. Spread the tomatoes, garlic, and onions onto a baking tray. Tie up the rosemary and parsley with twin and add onto the tray. Drizzle with a 1/2 cup of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, or until caramelized.
Remove the roasted tomatoes, garlic, and onion from the onion and transfer to a large stock pot. Cut off the twin from herbs and add to the stock pot as well. Add 3/4 of the chicken stock, bay leaves, and butter. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutws or until liquid has reduced by a third.
Wash and dry basil leaves and add to stock pot. Use an immersion blender to puree the soup until smooth. Return soup to low heat, add cream and adjust consistency with remaining chicken broth, if necessary. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and garnish with drizzle of cream before serving.

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{ Garden Vegetable Soup }

Garden Vegetable Soup with Rosemary Garnish

After getting back to Miami from New York, I was craving some home cooked food. Don’t get me wrong, I love going out to eat, but after a while I just start to crave something hearty, healthy, and homemade…and that describes Alton Brown’s garden vegetable soup perfectly. I have made this soup three or four times already and it is always delicious, although I do make some very minor modifications. The recipe below is my version, although you can find the original on the link at the bottom. Enjoy!

{ Ingredients }

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups chopped leeks, white part only (from approximately 3 medium leeks)
  • 2 tablespoons finely minced garlic
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 cups carrots, peeled and chopped into rounds (approximately 2 medium)
  • 2 cups peeled and diced Yukon potatoes (cubes)
  • 2 cups fresh green beans, broken or cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 2 quarts chicken broth
  • 4 cups seeded, and chopped vine tomatoes (about 7)
  • ½ cup frozen peas
  • 1 ½ cups sliced baby bella mushrooms
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

{ To Make Soup }

Heat the olive oil in large, heavy-bottomed stockpot over medium-low heat. Once hot, add the leeks, garlic, and a pinch of salt and sweat until they begin to soften, approximately 7 to 8 minutes. Add the carrots, potatoes, and green beans and continue to cook for 4 to 5 more minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the stock, increase the heat to high, and bring to a simmer. Once simmering, add the tomatoes, mushrooms, and pepper. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook until the vegetables are fork tender, approximately 25 to 30 minutes. Add the frozen peas and cook for 2 more minutes. Remove from heat and add the lemon juice. Season, to taste, with kosher salt. Serve immediately.

***I serve mine over ditalini pasta!

CHECK OUT THE ORIGINAL RECIPE!

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